The Story of the Shvartze Skovoroda

The cast iron pan above is one that has been in my family for four generations. My grandmother came to America from the Russian Ukraine about 100 years ago. After passing through Ellis Island, my grandmother’s family, including her mother and several siblings, settled in the Weequahic section of Newark, New Jersey. If you’ve ever read any of Philip Roth’s short stories or novels, such as Goodbye, Columbus or American Pastoral, many of them are set in this part of Newark.

After my grandmother got married and had kids, she lived in a two family house, with my great grandmother living in the upstairs half. My mother recently told me that her grandmother and her mother shared a tea kettle and “the shvartze skovoroda,” the black cast iron pan pictured above. Shvartze is the Yiddish word for black, and skovoroda is Russian for frying pan. I don’t know what has happened to the tea kettle, but my sister has the shvartze skovoroda. Both were placed on a shelf in the hallway that went between the two homes, and whomever needed it would use it, clean it and put it back. Undoubtedly, many of the meals that were made in it were shared. My mom has especially fond memories of the french fries the shvartze skovoroda produced.

After hearing the story of how it was shared by my grandmother and her mother, I proposed that my sister and I share the shvartze skovoroda. Since we don’t live in a two family house, we’ll share it on an annual basis going forward. Hopefully, as our kids set up homes of their own in the future, they’ll maintain what hopefully will become a tradition of sharing the shvartze skovoroda.

My wife and I use cast iron skillets most of the time. They are relatively inexpensive, easy to clean, and last several lifetimes. I don’t have an InstaPot (yet), but it is hard to imagine that one bought today will still be in service a hundred years from now.

Since it is Hannukah for a few more days, I’ll share my mom’s recipe for latkes, the traditional Jewish potato pancake served at this time of year. They are good by themselves, or topped with apple sauce or sour cream. My mom’s apple sauce recipe is included as well.

Latkes (Potato Pancakes)

Apple Sauce

The ReciFoto Team

If you are getting this newsletter, it means you have registered for ReciFoto, either the website or the app.

Many of you have already updated your ReciFoto app! That’s great if you have, and we hope you’ll consider upgrading to ReciFoto Plus, especially now that we’ve reduced the price to just $0.99.  ReciFoto Plus allows you to save other users’ recipes to your Collection for easy access later. Another great feature of ReciFoto Plus is that you can make private notes on recipes that are visible only to you. And of course, we would be delighted if you invited your friends to download ReciFoto, too, and start sharing their recipes.

We save past copies of this (usually) weekly newsletter on our blog, Wikirecipedia. Catch up on what you’ve missed! Interested in writing a guest post for Wikirecipedia? Drop us a line!

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Cauliflower is nothing but cabbage with a college education

Mark Twain once wrote, “Cauliflower is nothing but cabbage with a college education.” I love the quote, but am not sure of the context from which it was lifted. Here’s a fun cauliflower fact. The head of the cauliflower is often referred to as curd, since it resembles cheese curds. We eat a lot of cauliflower in our house, mostly roasted with olive oil, salt and garlic. One of my daughters only likes it steamed. Lately, I’ve been getting into “riced” cauliflower. Just throw the florets into a food processor and pulse until it resembles rice. You can then saute it and add whatever makes you happy. There’s a whole wide world of cauliflower recipes posted by ReciFoto’s users, though, so lets dive in.

Cauliflower Puree Soup

Cauliflower Au Gratin

Cauliflower Roast

Aloo Gobi

Sookhi Gobi

Cauliflower and Carrot Casserole

Baked Cauliflower

Cauliflower Pizza Crust

If you have any favorite cauliflower recipes, please share them on ReciFoto!

The ReciFoto Team

If you are getting this newsletter, it means you have registered for ReciFoto, either the website or the app.
Many of you have already updated your ReciFoto app! That’s great if you have, and we hope you’ll consider upgrading to ReciFoto Plus, especially now that we’ve reduced the price to just $0.99.  ReciFoto Plus allows you to save other users’ recipes to your Collection for easy access later. Another great feature of ReciFoto Plus is that you can make private notes on recipes that are visible only to you. And of course, we would be delighted if you invited your friends to download ReciFoto, too, and start sharing their recipes.

We save past copies of this (usually) weekly newsletter on our blog, Wikirecipedia. Catch up on what you’ve missed! Interested in writing a guest post for Wikirecipedia? Drop us a line!

If you need help or have questions, contact support@recifoto.com.

Thanksgiving Snack Plate

Let’s Talk Turkey

Let’s talk turkey. That is a colloquial expression that mean’s “let’s speak frankly.” I know there are many people who don’t like turkey. They feel that it has no flavor and is too easy to overcook. Or, maybe they just have had one too many bad turkey sandwiches made with rubbery turkey cold cuts. I’m a fan of a good turkey. A fresh turkey from a local farm, or even a frozen one of an heirloom breed can be an eye opening gustatory experience. However, the real stars of a Thanksgiving meal are the side dishes. They are packed with flavor and color to make up for anything you feel your turkey may be lacking. As usual, we picked mostly old recipes, which seems especially appropriate for a time of year that we celebrate family and tradition.

Turkey Roasting Time and Temperature for Recipe Above

Turkey Dressing (Stuffing)

Sweet Potatos

Candied Yams

Carrot Pudding

Corn Soufflé and Cranberry Glazed Carrots

Roasted Brussels Sprouts

Sweet Potato Puffs

Cranberry Sauce and Cranberry Jelly

Cranberry-Orange Relish

Applesauce Corn Bread

Pumpkin Pie

We hope you have a great Thanksgiving! Thanks for being a ReciFoto member. Keep adding those recipes!

The ReciFoto Team

If you are getting this newsletter, it means you have registered for ReciFoto, either the website or the app.
Many of you have already updated your ReciFoto app! That’s great if you have, and we hope you’ll consider upgrading to ReciFoto Plus, especially now that we’ve reduced the price to just $0.99.  ReciFoto Plus allows you to save other users’ recipes to your Collection for easy access later. Another great feature of ReciFoto Plus is that you can make private notes on recipes that are visible only to you. And of course, we would be delighted if you invited your friends to download ReciFoto, too, and start sharing their recipes.

We save past copies of this (usually) weekly newsletter on our blog, Wikirecipedia. Catch up on what you’ve missed! Interested in writing a guest post for Wikirecipedia? Drop us a line!

If you need help or have questions, contact support@recifoto.com.

Thanksgiving Snack Plate